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Thursday, 5 April 2012

Hammer's Hound of the Baskervilles (1959)

So suitable for the British horror studio was Conan Doyle's, The Hound of the Baskervilles that it could have been written with Hammer Films in mind. Indeed following their success with revamping the Dracula and Frankenstein franchises Hammer turned to the most famous fictional detective of them all, Sherlock Holmes for this movie which was intended to be the first in a new series with Peter Cushing in the title role. Alas the movie didn't perform as well at the box office as expected and plans for the series were scrapped while Hammer concentrated on more gothic material. Pity really - I would have loved to have seen Hammer tackle The Giant Rat of Sumatra.

The film looks like a Hammer movie - the colour is excellent, garish in places with all that over saturated red and the gothic elements that the studio did so well, are brought out in Doyle's story like never before. Of course they were always there, even in the original story but Hammer emphasise these parts of the storyline without really altering the original. There are some differences to the original story - Stapleton's webbed hands for one thing, the tarantula attack for another but these work well within the story and indeed the  webbed hands carried by one line of the Baskerville clan is inspired and is a nice little macabre touch.

Peter Cushing here gives an excellent performance as Sherlock Holmes - the actor was a Sherlockian himself and he brings his knowledge of the character to the role. Andre Morell is a more than suitable Watson. It is also nice to see Christopher Lee playing a romantic lead role and one wonders what would have happened had he played more such roles. He is certainly convincing here. All in all this is a great Sherlock Holmes movie and under the direction of Terence Fisher the ponderous middle section so obvious in most productions of this story moves along at a great pace.

Why wasn't it a big box office hit then? Well the blame for this lies with Hammer themselves. They promoted the movie as a big horror flick in the style of their successful Dracula and Frankenstein movies, with hardly any mention that this was in fact a Sherlock Holmes movie. The advertising posters suggested a kind of werewolf but when we see the hound on screen it is nothing more than an over sized Great Dane. Movie fans back in the day may have been disappointed - after all, they were going to see a film starring Hammer's two biggest horror icons with a large slavering hound in the advertising posters and what they got  Sherlock Holmes adventure. A damn thrilling one nonetheless but word of mouth could have harmed the movie after its strong opening weekend.  SEE THE ORIGINAL CINEMA TRAILER EMBEDDED BELOW TO SEE HOW THE FILM WAS MARKETED.

Still the movie's stood the test of time and this is a great version of the much filmed story - it's also nice to see the current DVD version showing such an impressive looking cut of the movie. The colours are vibrant and the sound booming. It is only a pity that it is a full frame 4.3 version on the UK release when I believe the American market get a true widescreen version.

Peter Cushing would of course go onto play Holmes for the BBC, but his performance as the detective here is perhaps his definitive stab at the part. Christopher Lee also got a stab at playing both Watson and Holmes in future Holmes movies but the less said about them the better.


buddy2blogger said...

Nice review of the movie!

I did not know that Cushing was a Sherlockian. Thanks for the info :)

Christopher Lee is a legend. He played not only Sherlock Holmes, but Mycroft Holmes as well in "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes".


Gary Dobbs/Jack Martin said...

Peter Cushing was a huge fan of Conan Doyle's stories. I have seen and read many interviews in which he talks about the canon. You can see he knows Holmes from both his performances in this and the BBC TV series. I don't think many of the other Holmes stories could have benefited from the Hammer treatment though the Sussex Vampire seems an obvious choice. By the way are you familiar with the series of Holmes novels from Titan Books which nish mash Holmes with other fictional characters. Just read one which put Holmes in the H G Wells universe which was quite good really.

Gary Dobbs/Jack Martin said...

Oh and I'll be reviewing The Private Life sometime next week.